Photography From The Field | March 2017 | The Royal Portfolio

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17 May2017

by Greg Cooke

'Photography From The Field' is a monthly collection of the best wildlife imagery taken by our Rangers and Trackers at Royal Malewane.

Good rains have continued well into the wet season, and the bush is looking unusually lush for this time of the year. The migratory birds have all but left, and only a few are still preparing for the long trip back north. Herds of herbivores continue to enter the reserve out of the Kruger Park, to capitalise on the abundant grasses left behind by the good rains.

Stormy Skies

I photographed this elephant crossing a clearing late one afternoon just as the sun was setting and a distant storm was rolling in. I used the rule of thirds to accentuate the clouds and to really show the scale of Low-Veld thunderstorms. – Riaan Fourie

Stalking Leopard 

This female leopard is well known to the Royal Malewane guiding team as she dominates the central parts of the Thornybush Private Game Reserve. We caught up with her early one morning as she was hunting impala in the tall grasses on the banks of the Monwana River. The rising sun was behind her creating beautiful pastel tones in the background. – Andre Fourie.

Lazy Lion Cub 

Unlike the adults, lion cubs tend to be very energetic. Their games of ‘tag’ can seem to go on for hours. This little male and his siblings did just that before he finally collapsed in front of our vehicle for a well-deserved rest. – Rudi Hulshof

Red-backed Shrike

Most of the migratory birds have already left our shores but this Red-Backed Shrike decided to stay a bit longer and bulk up on the abundance of insects. He will need the energy, as his yearly migration north will take him as far a field as the Czech Republic. – Juan Pinto

Flap-neck Chameleon 

Average temperatures are slowly dropping, forcing the cold-blooded reptiles into hibernation. These scaly creatures will, however, emerge in warmer weather to try and fatten up before winter really settles in. I got low to the ground for this shot of a flap-neck chameleon in order to blur both the foreground and background. – Ryan Jack

Encore

A few more beautiful images worthy of a feature:

Leave a comment below to let us know which is your favourite image for March.

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Flap-neck chameleon by Ryan Jack

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